Either a little late or a lot early

This spam I received to my work email account made me laugh. Not only am I happily married, I also have a fond appreciation for timeliness.

A bit late to the party

A bit late to the party

12 things to do (more of) in 2015

Selfie on Rockhouse Trail

I want to do more things that make me smile

2014 was a good year, though when I look back, there were things that I enjoy that I didn’t do nearly enough. We won’t call these resolutions, but merely ideas for things I’d like to do more of in the coming year.

1. Take my wife out for more dates
2. Take the family on more bike rides and hikes
3. Go on more mountain bike and road bike rides
4. Learn more than 3 songs and 3 chords on guitar
5. Spend more time in spiritual reflection
6. Take my older boys backpacking
7. Save more money
8. Eat better
9. Get more fit
10. Take more pictures
11. Be more content and satisfied
12. Pwn in Call of Duty

I miss blogging

I’ve been working on sort of a historical project this week at work, and it’s been great to look back through the archives of this blog to see what I did way back when.  I started this blog in 2004, I think, so sometime this year I missed the ten-year anniversary.  I used to write to be part of the community of librarians and involved in the conversations of my profession.  Those conversations have mostly moved from the blogosphere to twitter and Facebook groups.  Since my role at my work has changed since beginning this blog, I’m no longer able to write about the things I did way back when, and much of what I would be able to write about  now is not appropriate for public sharing.  I’ve thought over and over again about taking this blog down, but this week it has been useful to look back.  I’ve missed hitting that “publish” button.

Edit:  My first post was January 6, 2005 on this blog.  Looks like I still have time to plan a party.

I admit I have an email problem

The article  “Is there Life After Email?  Yes, and it’s Amazing.”   states that most business email is sent to either “cover your ass” or to “show off”.  I’m guilty of striving for excellence in both areas.

In the CYA statement, the author says that “Email is broadcast to entire divisions simply to ensure no one can say they didn’t hear about a decision.”  Yes, if someone complains they didn’t know about something, I am  guilty of re-sending them the sentmail from days or weeks ago.  It’s hard not to get a little satisfaction by passively rubbing their nose in the old email they were copied on.  For good measure, I’ve even highlighted portions that they should have read way back when.  This is one of the reasons I hardly expunge my sentmail folder.  Pretty silly and a little evil, eh?

The author also states that “for people who don’t actually make things for their job, email is the only visible, tangible thing they make all day. ”  Guilty as well, though I haven’t been one to measure how many email I send in a day.  Rather, I measure the size of my inbox.  It started at 5 on Monday, rose to about 30 yesterday, and is now back to 7 (hence me taking a time-out from email for this quick blog post).  If I have to stay home with a sick kid (which happens quite a bit with 4 boys), I’m able to “catch up” on email. Often this means my co-workers are on the receiving end of a full-on email bombardment that compares to the Normandy invasion.  It’s probably not fair to them, but it’s the work that I’m able to do remotely in that moment.   The problem is, those emails get responses, so the volley continues back and forth until one of us calls an email truce or silently surrenders.

Regardless of what my colleagues or I think about email, it is still a necessary technology in our line of information work.  We’ve used blogs, chat, wikis, twitter, and other technology to communicate within our organization and with those we serve, but none of those is ever adopted as universally as email, nor have they taken any traffic from the well-entrenched technology.  However, one colleague has me thinking again about using a WordPress P2 blog for non-essential/non-time-critical communication such as project updates, meeting minutes, or just personal “what I’m working on” or “I need help” conversations.  Has your organization used a P2 blog, and how did it work?  Perhaps we will investigate and/or give it a try.